All That Googling May Make People Feel Smarter Than They Are

In study, Internet searches seemed to boost users' sense of their own knowledge base


Early Tests of Experimental Ebola Vaccine Show Promise

Immune response seen in all study volunteers, side effects were manageable


Exercise Beneficial Even in Polluted Air: Study

Negative effects from pollution don't negate health gains from workouts, researchers say


'Exploding Head Syndrome' Surprisingly Common Among Young People

Complaint -- awakening due to loud, nonexistent noises -- was previously associated with old age


Head Injuries May Prematurely Age the Brain, Study Suggests

Researchers hope computer model could predict early problems from injuries


Health Highlights: April 1, 2015
  • Singer Avril Lavigne Has Lyme Disease

  • Joni Mitchell in Hospital

  • Doctors in Arizona Must Tell Women Drug-Induced Abortion May be Reversible


Health Tip: Cook Healthier With a Slow Cooker

Suggestions for crock pot use


Health Tip: Heading to the Beach?

Brush up on swimming safety


Man's Iced Tea Habit May Have Swamped His Kidneys

He drank 16 glasses a day, which probably contributed to health issues, report suggests


More Americans Survive Childhood Cancers, But Health Problems Persist

Malignancies and treatments can take toll on quality of life in adulthood, study finds


Newer Test for Down Syndrome Called 'Major Advance'

But it won't eliminate need for invasive diagnostics such as amniocentesis, doctors say


Night Owls Run Higher Risk of Health Problems, Study Finds

Even with the same amount of sleep as early risers, they were more prone to diabetes, muscle loss


One-Quarter of Narcotic Painkillers Misused, Study Shows

And about 10 percent of patients with prescriptions for these powerful drugs become addicted


Serving in Iraq, Afghanistan Not Behind Rising Suicide Rates in Military: Study

Instead, difficulty with returning to civilian life appears to increase risk, experts say


Simpler Antibiotic Regimen Helps Sick Babies in Developing Nations

Study findings suggest hospitalization isn't needed


Study Supports Use of Laparoscopic Surgery for Rectal Cancer

Less-invasive procedure had survival rates similar to open surgery, with less pain and shorter hospital stays