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What Are the 5-Year Survival Rates for Laryngeal Cancer?

What Are the 5-Year Survival Rates for Laryngeal Cancer?

Survival rates show the percentage of people with a certain type and stage of cancer who survive it for a certain period of time after they are diagnosed. A five-year relative survival rate is the percentage of people who are alive five years after they are diagnosed compared to the percentage of people who would be alive if they had never gotten cancer of the larynx. These are the people it includes:

  • Those who are free of disease (there are no signs of cancer)

  • Those who have few or no signs or symptoms of cancer

  • Those who are still being treated for cancer or are being treated again because the cancer came back 

Many people included in the five-year survival rate live much longer than five years after diagnosis. Also, because the statistic is based on people diagnosed and initially treated more than five years ago, it's possible that the outlook could be better today. People who are newly diagnosed often have a more favorable outlook. That's because of improvements in treatment.

Survival rates are based on large groups of people. They cannot be used to predict what will happen to a particular person. No two people are exactly alike. Treatment and responses to treatment vary greatly.

These are the five-year relative survival rates for each site of laryngeal cancer from the National Cancer Database for people diagnosed in 1998-99. If you have recently been diagnosed, you may have a more favorable outlook because of treatment improvements. Your survival rate also depends on the location of the cancer.

Five-year relative survival rates for cancer in the supraglottis:

  • Stage I cancer is 59 percent.

  • Stage II cancer is 59 percent.

  • Stage III cancer is 53 percent.

  • Stage IV cancer is 34 percent.

Five-year relative survival rates for cancer in the glottis:

  • Stage I cancer is 90 percent.

  • Stage II cancer is 74 percent.

  • Stage III cancer is 56 percent.

  • Stage IV cancer is 44 percent.

Five-year relative survival rates for cancer in the subglottis:

  • Stage I cancer is 65 percent.

  • Stage II cancer is 56 percent.

  • Stage III cancer is 47 percent.

  • Stage IV cancer is 32 percent.

Five-year relative survival rates for cancer in the hypopharynx:

  • Stage I cancer is 53 percent.

  • Stage II cancer is 39 percent.

  • Stage III cancer is 36 percent.

  • Stage IV cancer is 24 percent.

 
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