Health Encyclopedia

 

Health Encyclopedia Home



Amlodipine; OlmesartanAmlodipine; Olmesartan

Amlodipine Besylate, Olmesartan Medoxomil Oral tablet

What is this medicine?

AMLODIPINE; OLMESARTAN (am LOE di peen; all mi SAR tan) is a combination of a calcium channel blocker and an angiotensin II receptor antagonist. This medicine is used to treat high blood pressure.

This medicine may be used for other purposes; ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

  • heart problems like heart failure or aortic stenosis

  • liver disease

  • kidney disease

  • an unusual or allergic reaction to amlodipine; olmesartan, other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives

  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant

  • breast-feeding

How should I use this medicine?

Take this medicine by mouth with a glass of water. Follow the directions on the prescription label. You can take it with or without food. If it upsets your stomach, take it with food. Take your medicine at regular intervals. Do not take it more often than directed. Do not stop taking except on your doctor's advice.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed.

Persons over 65 years old may have a stronger reaction to this medicine and need smaller doses.

Overdosage: If you think you have taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once.

NOTE: This medicine is only for you. Do not share this medicine with others.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for your next dose, take only that dose. Do not take double or extra doses.

What may interact with this medicine?

  • eplerenone

  • grapefruit

  • medicines used for sleep during surgery

  • melatonin

  • potassium supplements

  • rifampin

  • salt substitutes

  • some diuretics

  • St. John's Wort

This list may not describe all possible interactions. Give your health care provider a list of all the medicines, herbs, non-prescription drugs, or dietary supplements you use. Also tell them if you smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs. Some items may interact with your medicine.

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

Visit your doctor or health care professional for regular checks on your progress. Check your blood pressure as directed. Ask your doctor or health care professional what your blood pressure should be and when you should contact him or her.

Women should inform their doctor if they wish to become pregnant or think they might be pregnant. There is a potential for serious side effects to an unborn child. Talk to your health care professional or pharmacist for more information.

You may get drowsy or dizzy. Do not drive, use machinery, or do anything that needs mental alertness until you know how this medicine affects you. Do not sit or stand up quickly, especially if you are an older patient. This reduces the risk of dizzy or fainting spells. Alcohol may interfere with the effect of this medicine. Avoid alcoholic drinks.

What side effects may I notice from receiving this medicine?

Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible:

  • allergic reactions like skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue

  • dark urine

  • diarrhea

  • fast, irregular heart beat

  • general ill feeling or flu-like symptoms

  • light-colored stools

  • loss of appetite

  • muscle pain or weakness

  • right upper belly pain

  • swelling of legs or ankles

  • trouble passing urine or change in amount of urine

  • unusual weakness

  • vomiting

  • weight loss

  • yellowing of eyes or skin

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your doctor or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):

  • dizziness

  • flushing

  • nausea

  • trouble sleeping

  • weak or tired

This list may not describe all possible side effects. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Where should I keep my medicine?

Keep out of the reach of children.

Store at room temperature between 15 and 30 degrees C (59 and 86 degrees F). Protect from moisture. Throw away any unused medicine after the expiration date.


 
Related Items
Wellness Library
  Managing Prehypertension Without Drugs
  Checking Your Own Blood Pressure
  What Those Blood Pressure Numbers Mean
  All About Blood Pressure Medication
  Understanding Diuretics
Drug Reference
  Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Methyldopa
  Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Propranolol
  Penbutolol
  Amlodipine; Atorvastatin
  Nebivolol
  Aliskiren
  Amlodipine; Valsartan
  Aliskiren; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ
  Amlodipine; Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Valsartan
  Bendroflumethiazide; Nadolol
Quizzes
  Blood Pressure Quiz
Daily News Feed
  Drug for Pulmonary Hypertension Shows 'Modest' Benefit in Studies
  Study Yields Genetic Clue to Rare Lung Disease
  Common Blood Pressure Drugs May Help Slow Dementia
  College Football Players May Be At Risk of High Blood Pressure
  Blood Pressure Swings Could Be Linked to Mental Decline: Study
  More Follow-Up Needed for Kids With High Blood Pressure Reading
  Self-Monitoring Blood Pressure Appears to Improve Results, Study Finds
  Channel Blockers for Blood Pressure Linked to Breast Cancer Risk, Study Finds
  Walking to Work Tied to Lower Diabetes Risk
  Vitamin D Supplements Don't Lower Blood Pressure: Study
  Eye Photography May Reveal Stroke Risk, Study Finds
  Many Risk Factors for Early Dementia Can Show Up in Teens
  Model Program Boosts Blood-Pressure Control for Patients
  Half of People With High Blood Pressure Don't Know It
  Genes Tied to High Blood Pressure Found in Black Americans
  Childhood Obesity Quadruples Chances of Adult Hypertension: Study
  More Evidence That Exercise Can Help Prevent High Blood Pressure
  Blood Pressure Drug Might Boost Chemo Success, Mouse Study Suggests
  U.S. Panel Rejects Blood Pressure Screening for Kids, Teens
  Link Seen Between Hardening of Arteries, Alzheimer's Plaques
  Stroke Affecting Younger People Worldwide, Study Shows
  Kidney Patients May Gain From Less Salt
  Snoring in Pregnancy Tied to Possible Health Concerns
  Certain Allergies Plus Blood Pressure Meds Could Be Bad Mix
  Study Finds Two Drugs Aren't Better Than One for Kidney Disease
  Healthy Lifestyle May Mean Healthy Pregnancy
  Bad Night's Sleep May Raise Blood Pressure in Kids
  Obesity Tied to Decline in Kidney Function
  New Blood Pressure Guidelines Raise the Bar for Taking Medications
  Anxiety Tied to Stroke Risk in Study
  Too Few Americans Aware of Their High Blood Pressure: Study
  Study Finds Black Women Most Likely to Have High Blood Pressure
  High Blood Pressure May Be Worse for Women
  Green Tea May Interfere With a Blood Pressure Medicine
  Sunlight Might Be Good for Your Blood Pressure: Study
  Low Vitamin D Could Up Risk for Birth Complication: Study
  Another Win for the Mediterranean-Style Diet
  High Blood Pressure in Young Adults Could Mean Heart Trouble in Middle Age
  Doctors Slower to Prescribe High Blood Pressure Meds to Younger Patients
  Blood Pressure Meds May Raise Risk of Serious Falls for Seniors
  Vegetarian Diet May Help Lower Blood Pressure, Research Suggests
  Diet to Reduce Blood Pressure May Also Stave Off Kidney Stones
  Keep Your Heart Healthy
  Nicotine Patches Don't Help Pregnant Women Quit Smoking: Study
  High Blood Pressure Common, Often Untreated in U.S. Hispanics: Study
  Even Slightly Higher Blood Pressure May Raise Stroke Risk: Study
  Diabetes in Middle Age May Cause Memory Problems Later
  Doctors Really Do Raise Your Blood Pressure
  Keeping Blood Pressure Low Halves Risk of Second Stroke: Study
  New Blood Pressure Guidelines May Take Millions of Americans Off Meds
  Helping Doctors Spot Who's Not Taking Their Blood Pressure Meds
  College Football Players Have Stiffer Arteries, Study Finds
  Aspirin Advised for Women at High Risk for Pregnancy Complication
  A Doctor's 'People Skills' Affects Patients' Health
  Implanted Device Lowers Blood Pressure in Rat Study
  Foreclosures May Raise Neighbors' Blood Pressure
  Using Internet, Apps to Manage Blood Pressure Has Dangers: Study
  Mouse Study Hints at How Mediterranean Diet Protects the Heart
  Music May Be Especially Stimulating During Pregnancy
  Heart Risks Depend on Which Blood Pressure Number Is High: Study
  More Americans Working to Control Blood Pressure, Cholesterol: CDC
  Snoring, High Blood Pressure in Pregnancy May Raise Apnea Risk
  Spats, Conflicts Can Raise a Woman's Blood Pressure
  Caffeine Affects Teen Boys, Girls Differently, Study Says
  High Blood Pressure May Sometimes Be Overtreated: Study
  Blood Pressure Kiosks May Not Always Give Accurate Readings
  Low Vitamin D Levels Linked to High Blood Pressure
  Childhood Malnutrition Linked to High Blood Pressure Later in Life: Study
  Ecstasy Use Tied to Rare Spinal Blood Vessel Problem in Teen
  High Blood Pressure May Up Psoriasis Risk for Women
  Home Blood Pressure Monitoring Likely Saves Money, Study Finds
  High Blood Pressure May Protect the Very Old From Dementia
  Exercise May Help Counter Health Risks of Sedentary Lifestyle
  Could Probiotics Help Tame High Blood Pressure?
  No Change in Heart Attack Rates for Younger U.S. Adults
Adult Diseases and Conditions
  Vital Signs (Body Temperature, Pulse Rate, Respiration Rate, Blood Pressure)
Pediatric Diseases and Conditions
  High Blood Pressure in Children and Adolescents