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Statistics About Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL)

Statistics About Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL)

Some people use statistics to try to figure out their chances of getting leukemia, of surviving a certain period of time, or of being cured. However, statistics show what happens to large groups of people. Because no 2 people are alike, statistics can't be used to predict exactly what will happen to a particular person. It is important to discuss your individual case with your doctor. 

These are some statistics from the American Cancer Society about CLL in the United States:

  • About 15,700 people will be told they have CLL in 2013.

  • The average age of people with CLL is around 72. It is rarely seen in people younger than age 40.

  • About 4,600 people will die of CLL this year.

 
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