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Mood DisordersTrastornos del Estado de ánimo

Mood Disorders

There are many mood disorders, sometimes called affective disorders - medical conditions that are associated with fluctuations in the chemistry of the brain and body - that require the clinical care of a psychiatrist or other mental health professional. Listed in the directory below are some, for which we have provided a brief overview.

Overview of Mood Disorders

Major Depression

Manic Depression / Bipolar Disorder

Dysthymia

Seasonal Affective Disorder

Depression and Suicide

 
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