Health Encyclopedia

 

Document Search by P09510



Vision, Hearing and Speech OverviewDescripción General de Visión, Audición y el Habla

Vision, Hearing, and Speech Overview

Vision, hearing, and speech are an important part of your child's life. When an infant first emerges into the world, his or her eyesight is immature, later developing the ability to focus. Hearing appears early in fetal development and is necessary for proper progression of speech and language. Monitoring your child's ability to see, hear, and speak is an important part of the health of your growing child.

The American Academy of Ophthalmology, the American Optometric Association, and the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) have recommended the following vision screening stages:

  • Newborn. All newborns are examined in the nursery for eye infections and other eye disorders, such as glaucoma.

  • 6 months. Visual screening of infants should be performed during the well-baby visits, particularly checking for how the eyes work together.

  • 3 to 4 years. Formal visual acuity tests and the complete eye examination should be performed.

  • 5 years and older. Annual visual screening tests and eye examinations should be performed.

Children develop speech, language, and hearing skills at different ages. However, hearing loss can lead to delays in your child's ability to make sounds, learn to speak, and communicate. The AAP recommends hearing screening for all newborns before they leave the hospital. Consult your child's doctor if you're concerned about your child's hearing or speech, or if you notice any of the following:

  • No response to sound at any age

  • Infant doesn't move or jump when a loud sound is made

  • No babbling by the time the infant is 9 months old

  • No words spoken by age 18 to 24 months

  • Doesn't follow simple commands by age 2

  • Poor voice quality at any age

 
Related Items
Adult Diseases and Conditions
  For Parents: Bicycle, In-Line Skating, Skateboard, and Scooter Safety
  Sports Safety
  Common Childhood Illness and Concerns
  Firearm Safety for Parents
  Your Child's Growth and Development
Pediatric Diseases and Conditions
  Mood Disorders in Children and Adolescents
  During an Asthma Attack
  Asthma and Children
  Asthma in Children Index
  Insect Bites and Children
  Anatomy of the Endocrine System in Children
  Hepatitis B (HBV) in Children
  Bipolar Disorder in Children
  School-Aged Child Nutrition
  Television and Children
  The Growing Child: 2-Year-Olds
  Pediatric Blood Disorders
  Thalassemia
  AIDS/HIV in Children
  Diphtheria in Children
  Meningitis in Children
  Whooping Cough (Pertussis)
  Poliomyelitis (Polio) in Children
  Anxiety Disorders in Children
  Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in Children
  Schizophrenia in Children
  Anatomy of a Child's Brain
  Inflammatory and Infectious Neurological Disorders
  Myasthenia Gravis in Children
  Chemotherapy for Children: Side Effects
  Brain Tumors in Children
  Ewing Sarcoma
  Inflammatory and Infectious Musculoskeletal Disorders
  Muscular Dystrophy
  Osteosarcoma in Children
  Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis
  Firearms
  Sports Safety for Children
  Bicycle, In-Line Skating, Skateboarding Safety--Injury Statistics and Incidence Rates
  Preparing the School-Aged Child for Surgery
  Bone Marrow Transplantation in Children
  The Heart
  The Kidneys
  Kidney Transplantation in Children
  Inguinal Hernia in Children
  Superficial Injuries Overview
  Vision Overview